devo's volleyball

http://devovolleyball.com – Australian volleyball: news and views

Imagine this in Oz

Posted by devo on September 24, 2009

The hardest match for the Aussie men in the pool play of the Asian Men’s Championships will be against Korea. I wonder how the events reported below will affect their game play? The bruising is certainly not an isolated event. I know of two travelers to Korea who have seen it happening. What is new here, is that Park reported it. Thanks to contributor M for the heads up.

The Korean Olympic Committee wants national volleyball coach Lee Sang-yeol to face criminal charges after a badly bruised player held a news conference to accuse Lee of beating him up. The KOC also said in a statement on Monday that South Korea head coach Kim Ho-chul should be dismissed for allowing the incident to happen and said it was determined to eradicate violence in sport. The Korea Volleyball Association (KVA) announced later on Monday it had sacked Kim and replaced him with another member of the coaching staff.

Korean international Park Chul-woo had appeared at a news conference on Friday sporting heavy bruising on his face and marks on his rib cage and said Lee had beaten him while his teammates looked on. “After a meeting with KVA Chairman Lee Jun-pyo and KOC Secretary General Choi Jong-jun present to discuss the use of violence in Park’s case, we have decided to ask Nowon district police to file charges against Lee Sang-yeol,” the KOC said in the statement.

The left side of Park’s face was heavily marked and the 24-year-old also pulled up his T-shirt to reveal bruises on his abdomen. Park was left out of the team for the Sept. 26-Oct. 5 Asian Men’s Volleyball Championships in the Philippines. read the full article

UPDATE: An interesting discussion of this incident.

8 Responses to “Imagine this in Oz”

  1. WiG said

    It certainly is not limited to Korea. I witnessed it on a Aus Youth team tour to Taiwan where the coach of the Taiwanese team called a time out and belted one of the kids for hitting a ball out during the end point of the set. No-one, not even the crowd reacted in any way to this.

  2. Yankee Boy said

    C’mon, the player hit the ball OUT. The key teaching moment here is what did the player do the next time they hit the ball, if it went in, then the belting was justified, if not then maybe he needed to be hit a little harder.
    This probably works until the player gets bigger and stronger than you, just ask Jason Taylor.

  3. My dad told me once when he was living in france he saw a member of the Japanese Men’s volleyball team get slapped by his coach.

    Corporal Punishment is still not unusual in a lot Asian cultures.

  4. devo said

    I have added a link to a Korean discussion of this incident.

  5. Steve said

    The heading of this thread suggests this would never happen in Australia.

    It would be fairly naive (and before the comments start flowing I am not suggesting anyone here is naive) to believe abuse of players by coaches does not occur in Australia.

    http://www.theage.com.au/news/national/under12-coach-suspended-over-racial-abuse/2005/07/31/1122748527150.html

    http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/sport/cctv-likely-to-ko-taylor/story-e6frexni-1225772218163

    • devo said

      The difference Steve, is that here in Oz, appropriate acton was taken. People thought it was wrong. In Korea, the Olympic Commiteee is fighting an up-hill battle. Good on the volleyballer for making a stand. Have a chat to Matt sometime about what he experienced in Korea.

      • Steve said

        Fair point, though the people involved were sacked, so people did think it was wrong and appropriate action was taken :)

        We just have to be careful that we don’t take a holier than thou attitude when commenting on things like this.

  6. markleb said

    What’s interesting for me is that the Head Coach spent the best part of 25 years in Italy, playing and coaching top teams and even their National B Team (against Australia in 2001). His daughter has been part of the National Junior Program in Italy. Clearly these sorts of things are not part of the culture of Italian volleyball and he obviously didn’t do it Sisley Treviso. But it seems the culture of abuse in Korea is so strong that even after all that time away he happily allowed it to happen on his watch.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

 
%d bloggers like this: